Link Prediction by De-anonymization: How We Won the Kaggle Social Network Challenge

March 9, 2011 at 12:30 pm 4 comments

The title of this post is also the title of a new paper of mine with Elaine Shi and Ben Rubinstein. You can grab a PDF or a web-friendly HTML version generated using my Project Luther software.

A brief de-anonymization history. As early as the first version of my Netflix de-anonymization paper with Vitaly Shmatikov back in 2006, a colleague suggested that de-anonymization can in fact be used to game machine-learning contests—by simply “looking up” the attributes of de-anonymized users instead of predicting them. We off-handedly threw in paragraph in our paper discussing this possibility, and a New Scientist writer seized on it as an angle for her article.[1] Nothing came of it, of course; we had no interest in gaming the Netflix Prize.

During the years 2007-2009, Shmatikov and I worked on de-anonymizing social networks. The paper that resulted (PDF, HTML) showed how to take two graphs representing social networks and map the nodes to each other based on the graph structure alone—no usernames, no nothing. As you might imagine, this was a phenomenally harder technical challenge than our Netflix work. (Backstrom, Dwork and Kleinberg had previously published a paper on social network de-anonymization; the crucial difference was that we showed how to put two social network graphs together rather than search for a small piece of graph-structured auxiliary information in a large graph.)

The context for these two papers is that data mining on social networks—whether online social networks, telephone call networks, or any type of network of links between individuals—can be very lucrative. Social networking websites would benefit from outsourcing “anonymized” graphs to advertisers and such; we showed that the privacy guarantees are questionable-to-nonexistent since the anonymization can be reversed. No major social network has gone down this path (as far as I know), quite possibly in part because of the two papers, although smaller players often fly under the radar.

The Kaggle contest. Kaggle is a platform for machine learning competitions. They ran the IJCNN social network challenge to promote research on link prediction. The contest dataset was created by crawling an online social network—which was later revealed to be Flickr—and partitioning the obtained edge set into a large training set and a smaller test set of edges augmented with an equal number of fake edges. The challenge was to predict which edges were real and which were fake. Node identities in the released data were obfuscated.

There are many, many anonymized databases out there; I come across a new one every other week. I pick de-anonymization projects if it will advance the art significantly (yes, de-anonymization is still partly an art), or if it is fun. The Kaggle contest was a bit of both, and so when my collaborators invited me to join them, it was too juicy to pass up.

The Kaggle contest is actually much more suitable to game through de-anonymization than the Netflix Prize would have been. As we explain in the paper:

One factor that greatly affects both [the privacy risk and the risk of gaming]—in opposite directions—is whether the underlying data is already publicly available. If it is, then there is likely no privacy risk; however, it furnishes a ready source of high-quality data to game the contest.

The first step was to do our own crawl of Flickr; this turned out to be relatively easy. The two graphs (the Kaggle graph and our Flickr crawl), were 95% similar, as we were later able to determine. The difference is primarily due to Flickr users adding and deleting contacts between Kaggle’s crawl and ours. Armed with the auxiliary data, we set about the task of matching up the two graphs based on the structure. To clarify: our goal was to map the nodes in the Kaggle training and test dataset to real Flickr nodes. That would allow us to simply look  up the pairs of nodes in the test set in the Flickr graph to see whether or not the edge exists.

De-anonymization. Our effort validated the broad strategy in my paper with Shmatikov, which consists of two steps: “seed finding” and “propagation.” In the former step we somehow de-anonymize a small number of nodes; in the latter step we use these as “anchors” to propagate the de-anonymization to more and more nodes. In this step the algorithm feeds on its own output.

Let me first describe propagation because it is simpler.[2] As the algorithm progresses, it maintains a (partial) mapping between the nodes in the true Flickr graph and the Kaggle graph. We iteratively try to extend the mapping as  follows: pick an arbitrary as-yet-unmapped node in the Kaggle graph, find the “most similar” node in the Flickr graph, and if they are “sufficiently similar,” they get mapped to each other.

Similarity between a Kaggle node and a Flickr node is defined as cosine similarity between the already-mapped neighbors of the Kaggle node and the already-mapped neighbors of the Flickr node (nodes mapped to each other are treated as identical for the purpose of cosine comparison).

In the diagram, the blue  nodes have already been mapped. The similarity between A and B is 2 / (√3·√3) =  ⅔. Whether or not edges exist between A and A’ or B and B’ is irrelevant.

There are many heuristics that go into the “sufficiently similar” criterion, which are described in our paper. Due to the high percentage of common edges between the graphs, we were able to use a relatively pure form of the propagation algorithm; the one my paper with Shmatikov, in contast, was filled with lots more messy heuristics.

Those elusive seeds. Seed identification was far more challenging. In the earlier paper, we didn’t do seed identification on real graphs; we only showed it possible under certain models for error in auxiliary information. We used a “pattern-search” technique, as did the Backstrom et al paper uses a similar approach. It wasn’t clear whether this method would work, for reasons I won’t go into.

So we developed a new technique based on “combinatorial optimization.” At a high level, this means that instead of finding seeds one by one, we try to find them all at once! The first step is to find a set of k (we used k=20) nodes in the Kaggle graph and k nodes in our Flickr graph that are likely to correspond to each other (in some order); the next step is to find this correspondence.

The latter step is the hard one, and basically involves solving an NP-hard problem of finding a permutation that minimizes a certain weighting function. During the contest I basically stared at this page of numbers for a couple of hours, and then wrote down the mapping, which to my great relief turned out to be correct! But later we were able to show how to solve it in an automated and scalable fashion using simulated annealing, a well-known technique to approximately solve NP-hard problems for small enough problem sizes. This method is one of the main research contributions in our paper.

After carrying out seed identification, and then propagation, we had de-anonymized about 65% of the edges in the contest test set and the accuracy was about 95%. The main reason we didn’t succeed on the other third of the edges was that one or both the nodes had a very small number of contacts/friends, resulting in too little information to de-anonymize. Our task was far from over: combining de-anonymization with regular link prediction also involved nontrivial research insights, for which I will again refer you to the relevant section of the paper.

Lessons. The main question that our work raises is where this leaves us with respect to future machine-learning contests. One necessary step that would help a lot is to amend contest rules to prohibit de-anonymization and to require source code submission for human verification, but as we explain in the paper:

The loophole in this approach is the possibility of overfitting. While source-code verification would undoubtedly catch a contestant who achieved their results using de-anonymization alone, the more realistic threat is that of de-anonymization being used to bridge a small gap. In this scenario, a machine learning algorithm would be trained on the test set, the correct results having been obtained via de-anonymization. Since successful [machine learning] solutions are composites of numerous algorithms, and consequently have a huge number of parameters, it should be possible to conceal a significant amount of overfitting in this manner.

As with the privacy question, there are no easy answers. It has been over a decade since Latanya Sweeney’s work provided the first dramatic demonstration of the privacy problems with data anonymization; we still aren’t close to fixing things. I foresee a rocky road ahead for machine-learning contests as well. I expect I will have more to say about this topic on this blog; stay tuned.

[1] Amusingly, it was a whole year after that before anyone paid any attention to the privacy claims in that paper.

[2] The description is from my post on the Kaggle forum which also contains a few additional details.

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In Which I Interrupt Your Regularly Scheduled Programming to Talk about Immigration Policy Privacy and the Market for Lemons, or How Websites Are Like Used Cars

4 Comments Add your own

  • 1. Jon O.  |  March 9, 2011 at 6:42 pm

    Any plans to release the Project Luther stuff?

    Reply
    • 2. Arvind  |  March 9, 2011 at 7:54 pm

      I’d very much love to, but realistically it’s probably not going to happen until I can find a volunteer collaborator or hire one.

      The problem is that there are a huge number of corner cases where the formatting breaks. Right now I only care about one paper at a time, so whenever something’s not right I go back and tweak the code. In fact, since it’s my own papers, I often just tweak the latex source to bypass whatever is causing it to break.

      Packaging Luther for general distribution is going to be a whole different ball game, and I suspect that the last 10% is in fact going to be 90% of the effort.

      Reply
  • 3. Sudipta Chatterjee  |  March 9, 2011 at 8:14 pm

    Wonderful write-up, sire! Instead of an academic bore, it was a very interesting and “well-connected” article.

    Reply
  • 4. Matt Wright  |  March 10, 2011 at 3:38 am

    Nicely done! Congrats to you and Elaine and Ben. I love the comment in the Kaggle forum post about how you were apparently breaking the laws of machine learning physics by making guesses that, by any reasonable measure, had to be considered wrong. Fun :-)

    Reply

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About 33bits.org

I'm an assistant professor of computer science at Princeton. I research (and teach) information privacy and security, and moonlight in technology policy.

This is a blog about my research on breaking data anonymization, and more broadly about information privacy, law and policy.

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