The Secret Life of Data

February 6, 2010 at 8:48 pm 1 comment

Some people claim that re-identification attacks don’t matter, the reasoning being: “I’m not important enough for anyone to want to invest time on learning private facts about me.” At first sight that seems like a reasonable argument, at least in the context of the re-identification algorithms I have worked on, which require considerable human and machine effort to implement.

The argument is nonetheless fallacious, because re-identification typically doesn’t happen at the level of the individual. Rather, the investment of effort yields results over the entire database of millions of people (hence the emphasis on “large-scale” or “en masse”.) On the other hand, the harm that occurs from re-identification affects individuals. This asymmetry exists because the party interested in re-identifying you and the party carrying out the re-identification are not the same.

In today’s world, the entities most interested in acquiring and de-anonymizing large databases might be data aggregation companies like ChoicePoint that sell intelligence on individuals, whereas the party interested in using the re-identified information about you would be their clients/customers: law enforcement, an employer, an insurance company, or even a former friend out to slander you.

Data passes through multiple companies or entities before reaching its destination, making it hard to prove or even detect that it originated from a de-anonymized database. There are lots of companies known to sell “anonymized” customer data: for example Practice Fusion “subsidizes its free EMRs by selling de-identified data to insurance groups, clinical researchers and pharmaceutical companies.” On the other hand, companies carrying out data aggregation/de-anonymization are a lot more secretive about it.

Another piece of the puzzle is what happens when a company goes bankrupt. Decode genetics recently did, which is particularly interesting because they are sitting on a ton of genetic data. There are privacy assurances in place in their original Terms of Service with their customers, but will that bind the new owner of the assets? These are legal gray areas, and are frequently exploited by companies looking to acquire data.

At the recent FTC privacy roundtable, Scott Taylor of Hewlett Packard said his company regularly had the problem of not being able to determine where data is being shared downstream after the first point of contact. I’m sure the same is true of other companies as well. (How then could we possibly expect third-party oversight of this process?)  Since data fuels the modern Web economy, I suspect that the process of moving data around will continue to become more common as well as more complex, with more steps in the chain. We could use a good name for it — “data laundering,” perhaps?

Entry filed under: Uncategorized. Tags: , , , , .

In which I come out: Notes from the FTC Privacy Roundtable Google Buzz, Social Norms and Privacy

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About 33bits.org

I'm an assistant professor of computer science at Princeton. I research (and teach) information privacy and security, and moonlight in technology policy.

This is a blog about my research on breaking data anonymization, and more broadly about information privacy, law and policy.

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